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Involvement of human amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in hunger-enhanced memory for food stimuli

Morris, J; Dolan, R; (2001) Involvement of human amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in hunger-enhanced memory for food stimuli. Journal of Neuroscience , 21 (14) 5304 - 5310. Green open access

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Abstract

We used positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 10 healthy volunteers performing a recognition memory task with food and non-food items. The biological salience of the food stimuli was manipulated by requiring subjects to fast before the experiment and eat to satiation at fixed time points during scanning. All subjects showed enhanced recognition of food stimuli (relative to non-food) in the fasting state. Satiation significantly reduced the memory advantage for food. Left amygdala rCBF covaried positively with recognition memory for food items, whereas rCBF in right anterior orbitofrontal cortex covaried with overall memory performance. Right posterior orbitofrontal rCBF covaried positively with hunger ratings during presentation of food items. Regression analysis of the neuroimaging data revealed that left amygdala and right lateral orbitofrontal rCBF covaried as a function of stimulus category (i.e., food vs non-food). These results indicate the involvement of amygdala and discrete regions of orbitofrontal cortex in the integration of perceptual (food), motivational (hunger), and cognitive (memory) processes in the human brain.

Type: Article
Title: Involvement of human amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex in hunger-enhanced memory for food stimuli
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Imported via OAI, 7:29:01 11th Aug 2007 This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
Keywords: Human, Memory, AMYGDALA, cortex, Food, HUMAN AMYGDALA, INVOLVEMENT, memory, NR, STIMULI
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/66459
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