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Conduction in segmentally demyelinated mammalian central axons.

Felts, PA; Baker, TA; Smith, KJ; (1997) Conduction in segmentally demyelinated mammalian central axons. Journal of Neuroscience , 17 (19) 7267 - 7277. Green open access

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Abstract

The prominent symptoms associated with central demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are primarily caused by conduction deficits in affected axons. The symptoms may go into remission, but the mechanisms underlying remissions are uncertain. One factor that could be important is the restoration of conduction to affected axons, but it is not known whether demyelinated central axons resemble their peripheral counterparts in being able to conduct in the absence of repair by remyelination. In the present study we have made intraaxonal recordings from central axons affected by a demyelinating lesion, and then the axons have been labeled ionophoretically to permit their subsequent identification. Ultrastructural examination of 23 labeled preparations has established that some segmentally demyelinated central axons can conduct, and that they can do so over continuous lengths of demyelination exceeding several internodes (2500 mm). Such segmentally demyelinated central axons were found to conduct with the anticipated reduction in velocity and a refractory period of transmission (RPT) as much as 34 times the value obtained from the nondemyelinated portion of the same axon; the RPT was typically prolonged to 2–5 times the normal value. We conclude that some segmentally demyelinated central axons can conduct, and we propose that the restoration of conduction to such axons is likely to contribute to the remissions commonly observed in diseases such as MS.

Type: Article
Title: Conduction in segmentally demyelinated mammalian central axons.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Imported from PubMed 24/10/2008 This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/52272
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