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The frequency and validity of self-reported diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease in the UK elderly: MRC CFAS cohort

Foltynie, T; Matthews, FE; Ishihara, L; Brayne, C; MRC CFAS, The; (2006) The frequency and validity of self-reported diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease in the UK elderly: MRC CFAS cohort. BMC Neurology , 6 , Article 29. 10.1186/1471-2377-6-29. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases can be made using established cohort studies but these estimates may have lower reliability if based purely on self-reported diagnosis.Methods: The MRC Cognitive Function & Ageing Study ( MRC CFAS) has collected longitudinal data from a population-based random sample of 13004 individuals over the age of 65 years from 5 centres within the UK. Participants were asked at baseline and after a two-year follow-up whether they had received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to make estimates of the incidence and prevalence of PD using self-reporting, and then investigate the validity of self-reported diagnosis using other data sources where available, namely death certification and neuropathological examination.Results: The self-reported prevalence of Parkinson's disease ( PD) amongst these individuals increases with age from 0.7% (95% CI 0.5 - 0.9) for 65 - 75, 1.4% ( 95% CI 1.0 - 1.7) for 75 - 85, and 1.6% ( 95% CI 1.0 - 2.3) for 85+ age groups respectively. The overall incidence of self reported PD in this cohort was 200/100,000 per year ( 95% CI 144 - 278). Only 40% of the deceased individuals reporting prevalent PD and 35% of those reporting incident PD had diagnoses of PD recorded on their death certificates. Neuropathological examination of individuals reporting PD also showed typical PD changes in only 40%, with the remainder showing basal ganglia pathologies causing parkinsonism rather than true PD pathology.Conclusion: Self-reporting of PD status may be used as a screening tool to identify patients for epidemiological study, but inevitably identifies a heterogeneous group of movement disorders patients. Within this group, age, male sex, a family history of PD and reduced cigarette smoking appear to act as independent risk factors for self-reported PD.

Type: Article
Title: The frequency and validity of self-reported diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease in the UK elderly: MRC CFAS cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2377-6-29
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2377-6-29
Language: English
Additional information: © 2006 Foltynie et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: PREVALENCE, ACCURACY, DISORDERS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/21507
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