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Testing the theory of immune selection in cancers that break the rules of transplantation

Fassati, A.; Mitchison, N.A.; (2010) Testing the theory of immune selection in cancers that break the rules of transplantation. Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy , 59 (5) pp. 643-651. 10.1007/s00262-009-0809-1. Green open access

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Abstract

Modification of cancer cells likely to reduce their immunogenicity, including loss or down-regulation of MHC molecules, is now well documented and has become the main support for the concept of immune surveillance. The evidence that these modifications, in fact, result from selection by the immune system is less clear, since the possibility that they may result from reorganized metabolism associated with proliferation or from cell de-differentiation remains. Here, we (a) survey old and new transplantation experiments that test the possibility of selection and (b) survey how transmissible tumours of dogs and Tasmanian devils provide naturally evolved tests of immune surveillance.

Type: Article
Title: Testing the theory of immune selection in cancers that break the rules of transplantation
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00262-009-0809-1
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-009-0809-1
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com. The article is published under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which allows users to read, copy, distribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes from the material, as long as the author of the original work is cited; please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5
Keywords: Transmissible, cancer, immune selection, epigenetic, occult tumour, tasmanian devils
UCL classification:
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/20038
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