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A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa

Jespers, V; Kyongo, J; Joseph, S; Hardy, L; Cools, P; Crucitti, T; Mwaura, M; ... van de Wijgert, JHHM; + view all (2017) A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa. Scientific Reports , 7 (1) , Article 11974. 10.1038/s41598-017-12198-6. Green open access

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Abstract

In cross-sectional studies increased vaginal bacterial diversity has been associated with vaginal inflammation which can be detrimental for health. We describe longitudinal changes at 5 visits over 8 weeks in vaginal microbiota and immune mediators in African women. Women (N = 40) with a normal Nugent score at all visits had a stable lactobacilli dominated microbiota with prevailing Lactobacillus iners. Presence of prostate-specific antigen (proxy for recent sex) and being amenorrhoeic (due to progestin-injectable use), but not recent vaginal cleansing, were significantly associated with microbiota diversity and inflammation (controlled for menstrual cycle and other confounders). Women (N = 40) with incident bacterial vaginosis (Nugent 7-10) had significantly lower concentrations of lactobacilli and higher concentrations of Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and Prevotella bivia, at the incident visit and when concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12p70) were increased and IP-10 and elafin were decreased. A higher 'composite-qPCR vaginal-health-score' was directly associated with decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-8, IL-12(p70)) and increased IP-10. This longitudinal study confirms the inflammatory nature of vaginal dysbiosis and its association with recent vaginal sex and progestin-injectable use. A potential role for proinflammatory mediators and IP-10 in combination with the vaginal-health-score as predictive biomarkers for vaginal dysbiosis merits further investigation.

Type: Article
Title: A longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microbiota and vaginal immune mediators in women from sub-Saharan Africa
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-12198-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-12198-6
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Bacterial infection, Diagnostic markers, Laboratory techniques and procedures
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1576498
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