UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Pain and somatic sensation are transiently normalized by illusory body ownership in a patient with spinal cord injury

Pazzaglia, M; Haggard, P; Scivoletto, G; Molinari, M; Lenggenhager, B; (2016) Pain and somatic sensation are transiently normalized by illusory body ownership in a patient with spinal cord injury. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience , 34 (4) pp. 603-613. 10.3233/RNN-150611. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Haggard_Reresubmission_Plasticity_and_analgesia_induced_by_illusions_of_body_ownership_in_a_patient_with_spi.pdf - Accepted version

Download (787kB) | Preview

Abstract

PURPOSE: Spinal cord injury (SCI), a profound impairment of sensorimotor functions, is often associated with pain related phenomena, including mechanical allodynia, a condition in which non-painful tactile sensation is perceived as pain. Pain and somatic sensation are undeniable markers of normal bodily awareness. However, the mechanism by which they are integrated into a coherent sense of the bodily self remains largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of high-level multisensory manipulation on subjective experiences of pain, touch, and body-ownership. METHODS: We administered visuo-tactile stimulation based on the rubber hand illusion. In a longitudinal study, we compared the strength of the illusion in a male with SCI, who initially had lost somatosensation in all his fingers, but a few months later reported signs of tactile allodynia restricted to the left C6-dermatome. RESULTS: After the restoration of some somatosensation, even if it were painful, synchronous but not asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation induced body illusion. Previously painful stimuli were temporarily perceived as less painful, and the patient further regained tactile sensations in adjacent numb areas. CONCLUSIONS: The sensations of touch and pain are mutually influenced and inextricably linked to a coherent representation of one's own body. Multisensory manipulations affecting the perception and representation of the body might thus offer a powerful opportunity to mitigate nociceptive and somatic abnormalities.

Type: Article
Title: Pain and somatic sensation are transiently normalized by illusory body ownership in a patient with spinal cord injury
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3233/RNN-150611
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/RNN-150611
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Bodily illusions, somatosensory perception, pain, allodynia, spinal cord injury, rehabilitation, analgesia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1574775
Downloads since deposit
328Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item