UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Rare, high-affinity anti-pathogen antibodies from human repertoires, discovered using microfluidics and molecular genomics

Adler, AS; Mizrahi, RA; Spindler, MJ; Adams, MS; Asensio, MA; Edgar, RC; Leong, J; ... Johnson, DS; + view all (2017) Rare, high-affinity anti-pathogen antibodies from human repertoires, discovered using microfluidics and molecular genomics. mAbs , 9 (8) pp. 1282-1296. 10.1080/19420862.2017.1371383. Green open access

[thumbnail of Goldblatt_6-7-2018_Rare, high.pdf]
Preview
Text
Goldblatt_6-7-2018_Rare, high.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Affinity-matured, functional anti-pathogen antibodies are present at low frequencies in natural human repertoires. These antibodies are often excellent candidates for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. However, mining natural human antibody repertoires is a challenge. In this study, we demonstrate a new method that uses microfluidics, yeast display, and deep sequencing to identify 247 natively paired anti-pathogen single-chain variable fragments (scFvs), which were initially as rare as 1 in 100,000 in the human repertoires. Influenza A vaccination increased the frequency of influenza A antigen-binding scFv within the peripheral B cell repertoire from <0.1% in non-vaccinated donors to 0.3-0.4% in vaccinated donors, whereas pneumococcus vaccination did not increase the frequency of antigen-binding scFv. However, the pneumococcus scFv binders from the vaccinated library had higher heavy and light chain Replacement/Silent mutation (R/S) ratios, a measure of affinity maturation, than the pneumococcus binders from the corresponding non-vaccinated library. Thus, pneumococcus vaccination may increase the frequency of affinity-matured antibodies in human repertoires. We synthesized 10 anti-influenza A and nine anti-pneumococcus full-length antibodies that were highly abundant among antigen-binding scFv. All 10 anti-influenza A antibodies bound the appropriate antigen at KD<10 nM and neutralized virus in cellular assays. All nine anti-pneumococcus full-length antibodies bound at least one polysaccharide serotype, and 71% of the anti-pneumococcus antibodies that we tested were functional in cell killing assays. Our approach has future application in a variety of fields, including the development of therapeutic antibodies for emerging viral diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Type: Article
Title: Rare, high-affinity anti-pathogen antibodies from human repertoires, discovered using microfluidics and molecular genomics
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/19420862.2017.1371383
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19420862.2017.1371383
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 GigaGen Inc. Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
Keywords: Influenza A, antibody repertoire, deep sequencing, microfluidics, pneumococcus
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1573447
Downloads since deposit
135Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item