UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Comparison of Two Whole-Room UV-Irradiation Systems for Enhanced Disinfection of Patient Rooms Contaminated with MRSA, carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium difficile spores

Ali, S; Yui, S; Muzslay, M; Wilson, APR; (2017) Comparison of Two Whole-Room UV-Irradiation Systems for Enhanced Disinfection of Patient Rooms Contaminated with MRSA, carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium difficile spores. Journal of Hospital Infection , 97 (2) pp. 180-184. 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.08.011. Green open access

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S0195670117304553-main.pdf]
Preview
Text
1-s2.0-S0195670117304553-main.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (366kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet light decontamination systems are being used increasingly to supplement terminal disinfection of patient rooms. However efficacy may not be consistent in the presence of soil particularly against Clostridium difficile spores. AIM: To demonstrate in-use efficacy of two whole-room UV decontamination systems against three hospital pathogens with and without soil. METHODS: For each system, six patient rooms were decontaminated with UV-irradiation (enhanced-disinfection) following manual terminal cleaning. Total aerobic colony counts of surface contamination were determined by spot-sampling 15 environmental sites before and after terminal disinfection and after UV-irradiation. Efficacy against biological indicator coupons (stainless-steel discs) was performed for each system using test bacteria (10(6) cfu EMRSA-15 variant A, carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae) or spores (10(5) cfu C. difficile 027), incorporating low soiling (0.03% bovine serum albumin [BSA]), heavy soiling (10%BSA) or synthetic faeces (C. difficile only) placed at five locations in the room. FINDINGS: UV disinfection eliminated contamination after terminal cleaning in 8/14 (57%) and 11/14 (79%) sites. Both systems demonstrated 4 to 5 log10 reductions in MRSA and Klebsiella pneumoniae at low soiling. Lower and more variable log10 reductions were achieved when heavy soiling present. Between 0.1 and 4.8 log10 reductions in Clostridium difficile spores were achieved with low but not heavy soil challenge. CONCLUSION: Terminal disinfection should be performed on all surfaces prior to UV decontamination. In-house validation studies should be considered to ensure optimal positioning in each room layout and sufficient cycle duration to eliminate target pathogens.

Type: Article
Title: Comparison of Two Whole-Room UV-Irradiation Systems for Enhanced Disinfection of Patient Rooms Contaminated with MRSA, carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium difficile spores
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.08.011
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2017.08.011
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Clostridium difficile, Environmental contamination, Ultraviolet light
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1572354
Downloads since deposit
260Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item