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Infectious causes of microcephaly: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management

Devakumar, D; Bamford, A; Ferreira, MU; Broad, J; Rosch, RE; Groce, N; Breuer, J; ... Abubakar, I; + view all (2018) Infectious causes of microcephaly: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. The Lancet Infectious Diseases , 18 (1) e13-e13. 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30398-5. Green open access

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Abstract

Microcephaly is an important sign of neurological malformation and a predictor of future disability. The 2015–16 outbreak of Zika virus and congenital Zika infection brought the world's attention to links between Zika infection and microcephaly. However, Zika virus is only one of the infectious causes of microcephaly and, although the contexts in which they occur vary greatly, all are of concern. In this Review, we summarise important aspects of major congenital infections that can cause microcephaly, and describe the epidemiology, transmission, clinical features, pathogenesis, management, and long-term consequences of these infections. We include infections that cause substantial impairment: cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, rubella virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Zika virus. We highlight potential issues with classification of microcephaly and show how some infants affected by congenital infection might be missed or incorrectly diagnosed. Although Zika virus has brought the attention of the world to the problem of microcephaly, prevention of all infectious causes of microcephaly and appropriately managing its consequences remain important global public health priorities.

Type: Article
Title: Infectious causes of microcephaly: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30398-5
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30398-5
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1571151
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