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Assessing cell-nanoparticle interactions by high content imaging of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

Hachani, R; Birchall, MA; Lowdell, MW; Kasparis, G; Tung, LD; Manshian, BB; Soenen, SJ; ... Thanh, NTK; + view all (2017) Assessing cell-nanoparticle interactions by high content imaging of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Scientific Reports , 7 (1) , Article 7850. 10.1038/s41598-017-08092-w. Green open access

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Abstract

Stem cell tracking in cellular therapy and regenerative medicine is an urgent need, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) could be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows visualization of the implanted cells ensuring they reach the desired sites in vivo. Herein, we report the study of the interaction of 3,4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid (DHCA) functionalized IONPs that have desirable properties for T2 - weighted MRI, with bone marrow-derived primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Using the multiparametric high-content imaging method, we evaluate cell viability, formation of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial health, as well as cell morphology and determine that the hMSCs are minimally affected after labelling with IONPs. Their cellular uptake is visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Prussian Blue staining, and quantified using an iron specific colourimetric method. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate that these IONPs are biocompatible and can produce significant contrast enhancement in T2-weighted MRI. Iron oxide nanoparticles are detected in vivo as hypointense regions in the liver up to two weeks post injection using 9.4 T MRI. These DHCA functionalized IONPs are promising contrast agents for stem cell tracking by T2-weighted MRI as they are biocompatible and show no evidence of cytotoxic effects on hMSCs.

Type: Article
Title: Assessing cell-nanoparticle interactions by high content imaging of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-08092-w
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08092-w
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Physics and Astronomy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1570488
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