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Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions

Fonseca, M; Malone, E; Lucka, F; Ellwood, R; An, L; Arridge, S; Beard, P; (2017) Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions. Presented at: Conference on Photons Plus Ultrasound - Imaging and Sensing, San Francisco, CA. Green open access

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Abstract

Photoacoustic tomography can, in principle, provide quantitatively accurate, high-resolution, images of chromophore distributions in 3D in vivo. However, achieving this goal requires not only dealing with the optical fluence-related spatial and spectral distortion but also having access to high quality, calibrated, measurements and using image reconstruction algorithms free from inaccurate assumptions. Furthermore, accurate knowledge of experimental parameters, such as the positions of the ultrasound detectors and the illumination pattern, is necessary for the reconstruction step. A meticulous and rigorous experimental phantom study was conducted to show that highly-resolved 3D estimation of chromophore distributions can be achieved: a crucial step towards in vivo implementation. The phantom consisted of four 580 μm diameter tubes with different ratios of copper sulphate and nickel sulphate as hemoglobin analogues, submersed in a background medium of intralipid and india ink. The optical absorption, scattering, photostability, and Grüneisen parameter were characterised for all components independently. A V-shaped imaging scanner enabled 3D imaging with the high resolution, high sensitivity, and wide bandwidth characteristic of Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensors, but without the limited-view disadvantage of single-plane scanners. The optical beam profile and position were determined experimentally. Nine wavelengths between 750 and 1110 nm were used. The images of the chromophore concentrations were obtained using a model-based, two-step, procedure, that did not require image segmentation. First, the acoustic reconstruction was solved with an iterative time-reversal algorithm to obtain images of the initial acoustic pressure at each of the nine wavelengths for an 18×17×13 mm3 volume with 50μm voxels. Then, 3D high resolution estimates of the chromophore concentrations were obtained by using a diffusion model of light transport in an iterative nonlinear optimisation scheme. Among the lessons to be drawn from this study, one is fundamental: in order to obtain accurate estimates of chromophores (or their ratios) it is not only necessary to model the light fluence accurately, but it is just as crucial to obtain accurate estimates of the initial acoustic pressure distributions, and to account for variations in the thermoelastic efficiency (Grüneisen parameter). © (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

Type: Conference item (Presentation)
Title: Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and inversion for accurate quantification of chromophore distributions
Event: Conference on Photons Plus Ultrasound - Imaging and Sensing
Location: San Francisco, CA
Dates: 29 January 2017 - 01 February 2017
ISBN-13: 978-1-5106-0570-1
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1117/12.2250964
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2250964
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Physical Sciences, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Optics, Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging, Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography, Chromophore Quantification, Model-Based Inversion, Phantom Experiment, Optical-Properties, Tomography, Water
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1570097
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