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Atlanto-occipital catheterization of young rats for long-term drug delivery into the lumbar subarachnoid space combined with in vivo testing and electrophysiology in situ

Kopach, O; Krotov, V; Voitenko, N; (2017) Atlanto-occipital catheterization of young rats for long-term drug delivery into the lumbar subarachnoid space combined with in vivo testing and electrophysiology in situ. Journal of Neuroscience Methods , 290 pp. 125-132. 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.08.001. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Catheterization has been widely used in neuroscience and pain research for local drug delivery. Though different modifications were developed, the use of young animals for spinal catheterization remains limited because of a little success rate. A reliable technique is needed to catheterize young animals aimed for in vivo testing combined with spinal cord electrophysiology, often limited by animal age, to facilitate pain research. NEW METHODS: We describe intrathecal catheterization of young rats (3-week-old) through atlanto-occipical approach for long-lasting drug delivery into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The technique represents a surgical approach of minimized invasiveness that requires PE-10 catheter and few equipment of standard laboratory use. RESULTS: Behavioral assessments revealed that spinal catheterization does not change peripheral sensitivity of different modalities (thermal and mechanical) and gives no rise to locomotive deficit or anxiety-like behavior in young rats. The long-term administration of genetic material (oligodeoxynucleotides given up to 4days), examined both in vivo and in situ, produced no adverse effects on basal peripheral sensitivity, but changed the AMPA receptor-mediated currents in sensory interneurons of the spinal cord. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS: Dissimilar to already described methods, the method is designed for the use of young rats for behavioral testing in vivo and/or spinal cord electrophysiology in situ. CONCLUSIONS: A practical method for spinal catheterization of young animals designed for studies in vivo and in situ is proposed. The method is rapid and effective and should facilitate investigation of therapeutic effects on both systemic and subcellular levels, as an advantage over the existing methods.

Type: Article
Title: Atlanto-occipital catheterization of young rats for long-term drug delivery into the lumbar subarachnoid space combined with in vivo testing and electrophysiology in situ
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.08.001
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.08.001
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Behavioral testing, Genetic material, Intrathecal delivery, Local treatment, Oligodeoxynucleotides, Peripheral sensitivity, Sensory interneurons, Spinal catheterization, Spinal cord electrophysiology, Young animals
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1570085
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