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Is mixed tenure, high density housing the answer to estate renewal in London? What are the barriers to effective implementation and do they undermine the goals of this emerging policy discourse

Bridgman, TWB; (2006) Is mixed tenure, high density housing the answer to estate renewal in London? What are the barriers to effective implementation and do they undermine the goals of this emerging policy discourse. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

High density, mixed tenure policy is influencing development throughout the country. In London, it is beginning to shape estate renewal delivery practices, with the buoyant housing market utilised to deliver the cross subsidy needed to rebuild ailing social housing provision. The Mayor's London Plan is pushing for a more compact city, which along with the 50% target for all housing development to be 'affordable' is also serving to push proposed densities on estate renewal schemes higher. Related to this is the concept of mixing communities to achieve a critical mass of social change and alleviate so called negative 'area effects'. While a range of policy goals are suggested in the pursuit of such policies, the government has not been explicit in setting clear objectives against which policy delivery can be tested. This dissertation analyses current research into high density and mixed tenure development. It seeks to better understand the impacts when the two outcomes are combined in the London context. Six case studies taken from current research are analysed against the proposed Woodberry Down estate renewal scheme, one of a number of emerging redevelopment projects based on emerging delivery practices towards high density, mixed tenure communities. A range of barriers to effective implementation are identified, which could impact upon identified goals. The reality is that as pressure grows to deliver more housing and facilities, with less land and government subsidy, these barriers will be traded off each other by local politicians in the hope of achieving the best possible outcome under increasingly difficult circumstances. Key to this is the need to engender strong local leadership, public sector control, a proactive planning system and economic viability, both in terms of initial scheme costs and longer term management.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Is mixed tenure, high density housing the answer to estate renewal in London? What are the barriers to effective implementation and do they undermine the goals of this emerging policy discourse
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Third party copyright material has been removed from the ethesis. Images identifying individuals have been redacted or partially redacted to protect their identity.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > The Bartlett School of Planning
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1569405
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