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International construction contracting: A study of the geographical and industrial structure of gross value added

Hetherington, WA; (2006) International construction contracting: A study of the geographical and industrial structure of gross value added. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This report centres on the role of construction in economic development, by appraising the performance of UK international construction contractors in overseas markets. The report discovered that less developed countries retain a lower percentage of gross value project turnover than newly industrialised countries, hindering economic development. It is elicited that this was as a result of project deliverers disfavouring of the engagement of subcontractors indigenous to the country of project performance, while favouring domestic subcontractors with formal partnering agreements. The report sought and offers suggestions on how to increase the levels of project turnover remaining within the country of project performance, and repatriated to the UK. The continued internationalisation of the UK construction industry is appraised and the research discovers that strategically firms do not currently favour developing over developing regions, although potential key geographical markets are identified. The research concludes with the presentation of a conceptual model, highlighting the levels of project turnover an economically classified region can expect to retain for different categories of construction project. Keywords: Economic development, UK international construction contractors, less developed countries, newly industrialised countries, subcontractors.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: International construction contracting: A study of the geographical and industrial structure of gross value added
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification:
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1569284
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