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Explaining subcontracting practices in China's construction industry: Application of transaction cost theory

Chen, S; (2006) Explaining subcontracting practices in China's construction industry: Application of transaction cost theory. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

During the last decades, the make-or-buy decision is being given more consideration within organisations because of its strategic implications. Subcontract decision-making is one of the key issues deriving from it. This paper develops empirical tests of nine hypotheses about make-or-buy decision in China's construction industry (CI) based on a thorough literature review of transaction cost theory, explains the subcontract's decision under what set of factors will drive managerial choice, especially which are the main influencing factors push a construction firm toward make-or-buy decisions. Moreover, it is concerned with evaluating the decision making variables for main contractor's consideration of subcontracting practice in China's CI, how it is likely to be happened and what the implications might be for the industry's clients and main contractors. Finally, an assessment model of subcontracting decision making factors is proposed. These empirical hypotheses of China's subcontracting practices have not been formally tested before and are supported by a series of interviews with experienced contractors, managers and professionals of China's CI. It is also believed that this will be amongst the first cross-sectional empirical observations of transaction cost make-or-buy theory using the data from China's CI.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Explaining subcontracting practices in China's construction industry: Application of transaction cost theory
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification:
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1568421
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