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Did the accuracy of oral amoxicillin dosing of children improve after British National Formulary dose revisions in 2014?: national cross sectional survey in England

Rann, O; Sharland, M; Long, P; Wong, ICK; Laverty, AA; Bottle, A; Barker, CI; ... Saxena, S; + view all (2017) Did the accuracy of oral amoxicillin dosing of children improve after British National Formulary dose revisions in 2014?: national cross sectional survey in England. BMJ Open , 7 (9) , Article e016363. 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016363. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Inaccurate antibiotic dosing can lead to treatment failure, fuel antimicrobial resistance and increase side effects. The British National Formulary for Children (BNFC) guidance recommends oral antibiotic dosing according to age bands as a proxy for weight. Recommended doses of amoxicillin for children were increased in 2014 ‘after widespread concerns of under dosing’. However, the impact of dose changes on British children of different weights is unknown, particularly given the rising prevalence of childhood obesity in the UK. We aimed to estimate the accuracy of oral amoxicillin dosing in British children before and after the revised BNFC guidance in 2014. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We used data on age and weights for 1556 British children (aged 2–18 years) from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey, the Health Survey for England 2013. INTERVENTIONS: We calculated the doses each child would receive using the BNFC age band guidance, before and after the 2014 changes, against the ‘gold standard’ weight-based dose of amoxicillin, as per its summary of product characteristics. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: Assuming children of different weights were equally likely to receive antibiotics, we calculated the percentage of the children who would be at risk of misdosing by the BNFC age bands. RESULTS: Before 2014, 54.6% of children receiving oral amoxicillin would have been underdosed and no child would have received more than the recommended dose. After the BNFC guidance changed in 2014, the number of children estimated as underdosed dropped to 5.8%, but 0.5% of the children would have received too high a dose. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to the BNFC age-banded amoxicillin doses in 2014 have significantly reduced the proportion of children who are likely to be underdosed, with only a minimal rise in the number of those above the recommended range.

Type: Article
Title: Did the accuracy of oral amoxicillin dosing of children improve after British National Formulary dose revisions in 2014?: national cross sectional survey in England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016363
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016363
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Keywords: Amoxicillin, Oral Penicillin, Children, Antibiotic Dosing, Age bands, British National Formulary
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1567907
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