UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Built environment report 2004-2005: The economical impact of an urban hollow - examination of the redevelopment project after the great Hanshin earthquake

Chiken, F; (2005) Built environment report 2004-2005: The economical impact of an urban hollow - examination of the redevelopment project after the great Hanshin earthquake. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Chiken.Fumio_thesis.pdf

Download (15MB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper examines spatial problem in the redevelopment project introduced by the government as a method of reconstruction of Shin-Nagata area in Kobe city after the Great Hanshin Earthquake. Reviewing the catastrophic damage of Shin-Nagata Area, the government decided huge redevelopment project as an urban planning, which is mainly based on the removal of small alleys inside urban blocks and the construction of many huge buildings in the town centre. However, what this spatial transformation brought is re-intensification of local urban blocks, and an "urban hollow" appeared in the town centre. Far from reconstruction, it aggravated economical decline which has continued before the earthquake as an inner-city problem. Due to the re-intensification of the urban blocks, density and interaccessibility within the town centre were decreased. In addition, the appearance of new shopping centres, which have spatially good conditions, plunged the town centre into the difficult situation. Summarising these facts, it turned out that the new spatial layout brought in the redevelopment project cannot contribute to the economical reconstruction of Shin-Nagata area.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Built environment report 2004-2005: The economical impact of an urban hollow - examination of the redevelopment project after the great Hanshin earthquake
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification:
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1567878
Downloads since deposit
20Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item