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An investigation of reception turn sequences in classroom interactions between a young deaf child and his deaf teacher

Pate, L; (2006) An investigation of reception turn sequences in classroom interactions between a young deaf child and his deaf teacher. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The present study uses Conversation Analysis (CA) to investigate the use of repetition turn sequences (RTS's) to facilitate spoken language in a young deaf child, over four months. Analysis was completed using one-to-one conversations between the child (EA) and his deaf teacher (T) in a classroom setting. Several themes arose from the analysis RTS's were used in a variety of sequential contexts over time. Turn's designed by T using both verbal and nonverbal communication, or solely nonverbal communication were more frequently repeated and/or imitated by EA. RTS's constructed when T and EA were mutually attending to one another or the same object were successful, for example, EA repeated and/or imitated T's prior turn. When EA and T did not share mutual attention, RTS's were unsuccessful, e.g. T's turns were designed to elicit repetition from EA but did not. Over time, EA repeated and/or imitated T's prior turns more frequently and produced more spoken repetitions. Therefore, over time, T's attempts to facilitate spoken language from EA, through the use of repetitions became more successful. These features are also discussed in comparison to the use of repetitions by typically developing children and possible implications for professionals working with deaf children are investigated.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: An investigation of reception turn sequences in classroom interactions between a young deaf child and his deaf teacher
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1567775
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