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An investigation into the verb production of a man with aphasia: Evidence for a modality-specific deficit

Kilburn, M; (2005) An investigation into the verb production of a man with aphasia: Evidence for a modality-specific deficit. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This single case study of KB, a gentleman with acquired anomic aphasia, analyses his verb production in written and spoken description tasks and writing to dictation. In the data analysed, he produced main verbs accurately 96.5% of the time in his spoken descriptions while only 28.7% of the time in his written descriptions of the same picture or in the written version of the same task. KB omitted nearly half (47%) of the required main verbs in written tasks, in striking contrast to no verb omissions at all in spoken tasks. The lower percentage correct for verbs, coupled with the unique phenomenon of verb omissions in written output, provide strong evidence of a modality-specific verb deficit. The results are discussed with reference to semantic/conceptual, general syntactic, and Independent Networks (Caramazza, 1997) theories. In addition, a possible summation of phonological and/or orthographic information with semantic information is considered with respect to the error types produced. The evidence from this study does not support purely semantic explanations of noun/verb dissociations, and is consistent with the suggestion that there are separate processing routes from semantics to forms, for nouns and verbs.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: An investigation into the verb production of a man with aphasia: Evidence for a modality-specific deficit
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1567741
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