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Endolysosomal targeting of a clinical chlorin photosensitiser for light-triggered delivery of nano-sized medicines

Yaghini, E; Dondi, R; Tewari, KM; Loizidou, M; Eggleston, IM; MacRobert, AJ; (2017) Endolysosomal targeting of a clinical chlorin photosensitiser for light-triggered delivery of nano-sized medicines. Scientific Reports , 7 , Article 6059. 10.1038/s41598-017-06109-y. Green open access

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Abstract

A major problem with many promising nano-sized biotherapeutics including macromolecules is that owing to their size they are subject to cellular uptake via endocytosis, and become entrapped and then degraded within endolysosomes, which can significantly impair their therapeutic efficacy. Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for inducing cytosolic release of the entrapped agents that harnesses sub-lethal photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a photosensitiser that localises in endolysosomal membranes. Using light to trigger reactive oxygen species-mediated rupture of the photosensitised endolysosomal membranes, the spatio-temporal selectivity of PCI then enables cytosolic release of the agents at the selected time after administration so that they can reach their intracellular targets. However, conventional photosensitisers used clinically for PDT are ineffective for photochemical internalisation owing to their sub-optimal intracellular localisation. In this work we demonstrate that such a photosensitiser, chlorin e6, can be repurposed for PCI by conjugating the chlorin to a cell penetrating peptide, using bioorthogonal ligation chemistry. The peptide conjugation enables targeting of endosomal membranes so that light-triggered cytosolic release of an entrapped nano-sized cytotoxin can be achieved with consequent improvement in cytotoxicity. The photoproperties of the chlorin moiety are also conserved, with comparable singlet oxygen quantum yields found to the free chlorin.

Type: Article
Title: Endolysosomal targeting of a clinical chlorin photosensitiser for light-triggered delivery of nano-sized medicines
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06109-y
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06109-y
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Biophysical chemistry, Drug delivery
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1566965
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