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Predicate acquisition: Is there an advantage for children learning British Sign Language?

Blackwell, R; (2007) Predicate acquisition: Is there an advantage for children learning British Sign Language? Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This study looked at predicate acquisition in comparison to noun acquisition in children learning BSL and English over a 20 month period using the MacArthur Bates Communicative Development Inventory. The study used 61 children learning BSL (29 deaf children and 32 Children of Deaf Adults) and 548 children learning English. The study found that children learning BSL between 8-17 99 months had significantly more predicates in their productive vocabulary (p<.005) than children learning English/however this was not the observable trend for the whole of the research study. It also found that in BSL, predicate vocabulary did not take up a greater proportion of signs in comparison with nouns, which were still consistently the largest grammatical group present in both English and BSL early vocabularies. S The conclusions of this study have been made with extreme caution due to extensive methodological limitationswhich were recognised in using and comparing the two different languages.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Predicate acquisition: Is there an advantage for children learning British Sign Language?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Third party copyright material has been removed from the ethesis. Images identifying individuals have been redacted or partially redacted to protect their identity.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1566819
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