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Functional NIRS Measurement of Cytochrome-C-Oxidase Demonstrates a More Brain-Specific Marker of Frontal Lobe Activation Compared to the Haemoglobins

de Roever, I; Bale, G; Cooper, RJ; Tachtsidis, I; (2017) Functional NIRS Measurement of Cytochrome-C-Oxidase Demonstrates a More Brain-Specific Marker of Frontal Lobe Activation Compared to the Haemoglobins. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology , 977 pp. 141-147. 10.1007/978-3-319-55231-6_19. Green open access

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Abstract

Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly common neuromonitoring technique used to observe evoked haemodynamic changes in the brain in response to a stimulus. The measurement is typically in terms of concentration changes of oxy- (∆HbO2) and deoxy- (∆HHb) haemoglobin. However, noise from systemic fluctuations in the concentration of these chromophores can contaminate stimulus-evoked haemodynamic responses, leading to misinterpretation of results. Short-separation channels can be used to regress out extracerebral haemodynamics to better reveal cerebral changes, significantly improving the reliability of fNIRS. Broadband NIRS can be used to additionally monitor concentration changes of the oxidation state of cytochrome-c-oxidase (∆oxCCO). Recent studies have shown ∆oxCCO to be a depth-dependent and hence brain-specific signal. This study aims to investigate whether ∆oxCCO can produce a more robust marker of functional activation. Continuous frontal lobe NIRS measurements were collected from 17 healthy adult volunteers. Short 1 cm source-detector separation channels were regressed from longer separation channels in order to minimise the extracerebral contribution to standard fNIRS channels. Significant changes in ∆HbO2 and ∆HHb were seen at 1 cm channels but were not observed in ∆oxCCO. An improvement in the haemodynamic signals was achieved with regression of the 1 cm channel. Broadband NIRS-measured concentration changes of the oxidation state of cytochrome-c-oxidase has the potential to be an alternative and more brain-specific marker of functional activation.

Type: Article
Title: Functional NIRS Measurement of Cytochrome-C-Oxidase Demonstrates a More Brain-Specific Marker of Frontal Lobe Activation Compared to the Haemoglobins
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-55231-6_19
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-55231-6_19
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2017 Open Access This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this chapter are included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Keywords: Cytochrome-c-oxidase, Functional activation, Haemodynamics, Near-infrared spectroscopy, Short-separation regression
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Electronic and Electrical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1566570
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