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Bleeding-Related Hospital Admissions and 30-Day Re-Admissions in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Dabigatran versus Warfarin

Lau, WCY; Xue, L; Wong, ICK; Man, KCK; Lip, GYH; Leung, WK; Siu, CW; (2017) Bleeding-Related Hospital Admissions and 30-Day Re-Admissions in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Dabigatran versus Warfarin. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis , 15 (10) pp. 1923-1933. 10.1111/jth.13780. Green open access

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Abstract

Essentials • Bleeding is a common cause of hospital admission and re-admission in oral anticoagulant users. • Patients with dabigatran and warfarin were included to assess hospital admission risk. • Dabigatran users had a higher risk of 30-day re-admission with bleeding versus warfarin users. • Close monitoring following hospital discharge for dabigatran-related bleeding is warranted. Summary Background: Reducing 30-day hospital re-admission is a policy priority worldwide. Warfarin-related bleeding is among the most common cause of hospital admissions due to adverse drug events. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran achieve full anticoagulation effect more quickly following its initiation, hence may lead to early-onset bleeds. Objectives: To compare the incidence of bleeding-related hospital admissions and 30-day re-admissions with dabigatran versus warfarin in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Methods: Retrospective cohort study using a population-wide database managed by the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. Patients newly diagnosed with NVAF from 2010 through 2014 and prescribed dabigatran or warfarin were 1:1 matched by propensity score. The incidence rate of hospital admission with bleeding (a composite of gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and bleeding at other sites) was assessed. Results: Among the 51946 patients with NVAF, 8309 users of dabigatran or warfarin were identified, with 5160 patients matched by propensity score. The incidence of first hospitalized bleeding did not differ significantly between groups (incidence rate ratio: 0.92; 95% confidence interval[CI]: 0.66-1.28). Among patients who were continuously prescribed with their initial anticoagulants upon discharge, dabigatran use was associated with a higher risk of 30-day re-admission with bleeding over warfarin (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.87; 95%CI: 1.10-7.43). Conclusion: When compared to warfarin, dabigatran was associated with a comparable incidence of first hospital admission but a higher risk of 30-day re-admission with respect to bleeding. Close early monitoring of patients initiated on dabigatran following hospital discharge for bleeding is warranted.

Type: Article
Title: Bleeding-Related Hospital Admissions and 30-Day Re-Admissions in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Treated with Dabigatran versus Warfarin
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jth.13780
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.13780
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: re-admission, atrial fibrillation, dabigatran, warfarin, anticoagulant, bleeding
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1565267
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