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A high prevalence CCDC103 p.His154Pro mutation causing primary ciliary dyskinesia disrupts protein oligomerisation and is associated with normal diagnostic investigations

Mitchison, HM; (2017) A high prevalence CCDC103 p.His154Pro mutation causing primary ciliary dyskinesia disrupts protein oligomerisation and is associated with normal diagnostic investigations. Thorax 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-210776. Green open access

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Abstract

RATIONALE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous inherited condition characterised by progressive lung disease arising from abnormal cilia function. Approximately half of patients have situs inversus. The estimated prevalence of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the UK South Asian population is 1:2265. Early, accurate diagnosis is key to implementing appropriate management but clinical diagnostic tests can be equivocal. OBJECTIVES: To determine the importance of genetic screening for primary ciliary dyskinesia in a UK South Asian population with a typical clinical phenotype, where standard testing is inconclusive. METHODS: Next-generation sequencing was used to screen 86 South Asian patients who had a clinical history consistent with primary ciliary dyskinesia. The effect of a CCDC103 p.His154Pro missense variant compared with other dynein arm-associated gene mutations on diagnostic/phenotypic variability was tested. CCDC103 p.His154Pro variant pathogenicity was assessed by oligomerisation assay. RESULT: Sixteen of 86 (19%) patients carried a homozygous CCDC103 p.His154Pro mutation which was found to disrupt protein oligomerisation. Variable diagnostic test results were obtained including normal nasal nitric oxide levels, normal ciliary beat pattern and frequency and a spectrum of partial and normal dynein arm retention. Fifteen (94%) patients or their sibling(s) had situs inversus suggesting CCDC103 p.His154Pro patients without situs inversus are missed. CONCLUSIONS: The CCDC103 p.His154Pro mutation is more prevalent than previously thought in the South Asian community and causes primary ciliary dyskinesia that can be difficult to diagnose using pathology-based clinical tests. Genetic testing is critical when there is a strong clinical phenotype with inconclusive standard diagnostic tests.

Type: Article
Title: A high prevalence CCDC103 p.His154Pro mutation causing primary ciliary dyskinesia disrupts protein oligomerisation and is associated with normal diagnostic investigations
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-210776
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-210776
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Institute of Prion Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Institute of Prion Diseases > MRC Prion Unit at UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1563852
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