UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

An experimental study addressing the use of geoforensic analysis for the exploitation of improvised explosive devices (IEDs)

Wilks, B; Morgan, RM; Rose, NL; (2017) An experimental study addressing the use of geoforensic analysis for the exploitation of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Forensic Science International , 278 pp. 52-67. 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.06.028. Green open access

[thumbnail of Morgan_1-s2.0-S0379073817302359-main.pdf]
Preview
Text
Morgan_1-s2.0-S0379073817302359-main.pdf - Published Version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

The use of geoforensic analysis in criminal investigations is continuing to develop, with the diversification of analytical techniques, many of which are semi-automated, facilitating prompt analysis of large sample sets at a relatively low cost. Whilst micro-scale geoforensic analysis has been shown to assist criminal investigations including homicide (Concheri et al., 2011 [1]), wildlife crime (Morgan et al., 2006 [2]), illicit drug distribution (Stanley, 1992 [3]), and burglary (Mildenhall, 2006 [4]), its application to the pressing international security threat posed by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) is yet to be considered. This experimental study simulated an IED supply chain from the sourcing of raw materials through to device emplacement. Mineralogy, quartz grain surface texture analysis (QGSTA) and particle size analysis (PSA) were used to assess whether environmental materials were transferred and subsequently persisted on the different components of three pressure plate IEDs. The research also addressed whether these samples were comprised of material from single or multiple geographical provenances that represented supply chain activity nodes. The simulation demonstrated that material derived from multiple activity nodes, was transferred and persisted on device components. The results from the mineralogy and QGSTA illustrated the value these techniques offer for the analysis of mixed provenance samples. The results from the PSA, which produces a bulk signature of the sample, failed to distinguish multiple provenances. The study also considered how the environmental material recovered could be used to generate information regarding the geographical locations the device had been in contact with, in an intelligence style investigation, and demonstrated that geoforensic analysis has the potential to be of value to international counter-IED efforts. It is a tool that may be used to prevent the distribution of large quantities of devices, by aiding the identification of the geographical location of key activity nodes.

Type: Article
Title: An experimental study addressing the use of geoforensic analysis for the exploitation of improvised explosive devices (IEDs)
Location: Ireland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.06.028
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.06.028
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Counter-improvised explosive devices (IEDs), Forensic reconstruction, Mineralogy, Particle size analysis, Quartz grain surface texture analysis (QGSTA)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Geography
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1563541
Downloads since deposit
120Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item