UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Childhood cognitive ability and age-related changes in physical capability from midlife: findings from a British birth cohort study.

Cooper, R; Richards, M; Kuh, D; (2017) Childhood cognitive ability and age-related changes in physical capability from midlife: findings from a British birth cohort study. Psychosom Med 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000482. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Cooper_Childhood_cognitive_ability_and_age_related.98811.pdf]
Preview
Text
Cooper_Childhood_cognitive_ability_and_age_related.98811.pdf - Published Version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that higher childhood cognitive ability is associated with reduced risk of decline in physical capability in late midlife. METHODS: Participants were 1954 men and women from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development with complete data on cognitive ability at age 15 and measures of grip strength and chair rise speed at ages 53 and 60-64 years. Using multinomial logistic regression, associations of childhood cognitive ability with categories of change in grip strength and chair rise speed (i.e. decline; stable high; stable low; reference) were investigated. Adjustments were made for potential confounders from early life and adult mediators including health behaviours, educational level and cognitive ability at age 53. RESULTS: Higher childhood cognitive scores were associated with reduced risks of decline in grip strength and chair rise speed; for example, the sex-adjusted relative-risk ratio (RRR) of decline (vs reference) in grip strength per 1SD increase in childhood cognitive score was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.92). Higher childhood cognitive scores were also associated with reduced risk of stable low and, increased likelihood of stable high chair rise speed. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that childhood cognitive ability may be related to decline in physical capability in late midlife. A number of life course pathways are implicated, including those linking childhood and adult cognitive ability. Future research aiming to identify new opportunities to prevent or minimise age-related declines in physical capability may benefit from considering the potential role of neurodevelopmental as well as neurodegenerative pathways.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Type: Article
Title: Childhood cognitive ability and age-related changes in physical capability from midlife: findings from a British birth cohort study.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000482
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000482
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1563354
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item