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Pathogenic p62/SQSTM1 mutations impair energy metabolism through limitation of mitochondrial substrates

Bartolome, F; Esteras, N; Martin-Requero, A; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, C; Vercelletto, M; Gabelle, A; Le Ber, I; ... Abramov, AY; + view all (2017) Pathogenic p62/SQSTM1 mutations impair energy metabolism through limitation of mitochondrial substrates. Science Reports , 7 , Article 1666. 10.1038/s41598-017-01678-4. Green open access

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Abstract

Abnormal mitochondrial function has been found in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in the p62 gene (also known as SQSTM1) which encodes the p62 protein have been reported in both disorders supporting the idea of an ALS/FTD continuum. In this work the role of p62 in energy metabolism was studied in fibroblasts from FTD patients carrying two independent pathogenic mutations in the p62 gene, and in a p62-knock-down (p62 KD) human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). We found that p62 deficiency is associated with inhibited complex I mitochondrial respiration due to lack of NADH for the electron transport chain. This deficiency was also associated with increased levels of NADPH reflecting a higher activation of pentose phosphate pathway as this is accompanied with higher cytosolic reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Complex I inhibition resulted in lower mitochondrial membrane potential and higher cytosolic ROS production. Pharmacological activation of transcription factor Nrf2 increased mitochondrial NADH levels and restored mitochondrial membrane potential in p62-deficient cells. Our results suggest that the phenotype is caused by a loss-of-function effect, because similar alterations were found both in the mutant fibroblasts and the p62 KD model. These findings highlight the implication of energy metabolism in pathophysiological events associated with p62 deficiency.

Type: Article
Title: Pathogenic p62/SQSTM1 mutations impair energy metabolism through limitation of mitochondrial substrates
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-01678-4
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-01678-4
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Bioenergetics
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1557057
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