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Systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of polyautoimmunity in Sjögren’s syndrome (secondary Sjögren’s syndrome) focusing on autoimmune rheumatic diseases

Alani, H; Henty, J; Thompson, N; Jury, E; Ciurtin, C; (2018) Systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of polyautoimmunity in Sjögren’s syndrome (secondary Sjögren’s syndrome) focusing on autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology , 47 (2) pp. 141-154. 10.1080/03009742.2017.1324909. Green open access

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Abstract

Healthcare on license from Scandinavian Rheumatology Research Foundation Objective: The epidemiology of polyautoimmunity in Sjögren’s syndrome (secondary Sjögren’s syndrome – sSS) is not well defined and has not been investigated before using a systematic approach. We conducted a systematic review of the epidemiology of sSS associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, and myositis, assessing the prevalence rates (PRs) and clinical and serological features of sSS. Method: A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase databases (updated to March 2016) was performed to identify all published data on PR, demographic profile, clinical manifestations, laboratory features, and causes of death associated with sSS. The PR’s of sSS were summarized with PRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The literature search identified 1639 citations, of which 42 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Only 19 studies were of moderate to good quality and were selected for the meta-analysis. According to a random-effects model, the pooled PR for sSS associated with RA was 19.5% (95% CI 11.2 to 27.8) and the pooled PR for sSS associated with SLE was 13.96% (95% CI 8.88 to 19.04). The female/male ratio of sSS in the RA population was 14.7 (95% CI 7.09 to 256) and in the SLE population was 16.82 (95% CI 1.22 to 32.4). Conclusion: Prevalence rates of sSS vary widely in different populations. Both meta-analyses conducted in the RA and SLE populations were characterized by a high degree of study heterogeneity. The results of this meta-analysis highlight the need for better quality population studies.

Type: Article
Title: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of polyautoimmunity in Sjögren’s syndrome (secondary Sjögren’s syndrome) focusing on autoimmune rheumatic diseases
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/03009742.2017.1324909
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03009742.2017.1324909
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1553504
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