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Hepatitis B serological markers and plasma DNA concentrations

Price, H; Dunn, D; Zachary, T; Vudriko, T; Chirara, M; Kityo, C; Munderi, P; ... DART Virology Group, .; + view all (2017) Hepatitis B serological markers and plasma DNA concentrations. AIDS , 31 (8) pp. 1109-1117. 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001454. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To examine hepatitis B (HBV) serological markers and plasma DNA concentrations in a large group of untreated HBV/HIV-coinfected individuals in two sub-Saharan settings. DESIGN: Baseline analysis of a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: DART was a large trial of treatment monitoring practices in HIV-infected adults with advanced disease starting antiretroviral therapy at centres in Kampala or Entebbe, Uganda (n = 2317) and Harare, Zimbabwe (n = 999). HBV serological markers [antibody to HBV core antigen, HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to HBV surface antigen, HBV 'e' antigen (HBeAg), and antibody to hepatitis B 'e' antigen] and plasma HBV DNA viral load were measured retrospectively on stored baseline samples. Logistic regression was used to examine associations with baseline demographic and clinical factors. RESULTS: The rate of HBsAg positivity was significantly higher in Zimbabwe than Uganda (12.2 vs. 7.7%, adjusted odds ratio = 1.54, P < 0.001) despite a similar prevalence of antibody to HBV core antigen (56.3 vs. 52.4%) in the two settings. Overall, HBsAg positivity was associated with male sex (adjusted odds ratio = 1.54, P < 0.001) but not with age, WHO disease stage, or CD4 cell count. HBeAg was detected among 37% of HBsAg-positive patients, with higher rates among those with advanced WHO stage (P = 0.02). Also in HBsAg-positive patients, HBV DNA was undetectable in 21%, detectable but below the level of quantification in 14%, and quantifiable in 65%. A total of 96% of HBeAg-positive and 70% of HBeAg-negative patients had detectable HBV DNA; 92 and 28% of patients, respectively, had HBV DNA viral load more than 2000 IU/ml. CONCLUSION: High rates of HBV coinfection were observed, highlighting the importance of ensuring that coinfected patients receive an antiretroviral regimen, whether first-line or not, that is active against both viruses.

Type: Article
Title: Hepatitis B serological markers and plasma DNA concentrations
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001454
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001454
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: epidemiology, hepatitis B, hepatitis B ‘e’ antigen, hepatitis B viral load, HIV, Uganda, Zimbabwe
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1551120
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