UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Monitoring summer indoor overheating in the London housing stock

Pathan, A; Mavrogianni, A; Summerfield, A; Oreszczyn, T; Davies, M; (2017) Monitoring summer indoor overheating in the London housing stock. Energy and Buildings , 141 pp. 361-378. 10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.02.049. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Davies_Revised manuscript (clean).pdf - Accepted version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

In light of current climate change projections in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the assessment of indoor overheating in domestic environments in previously heating-dominated climates. This paper presents a monitoring study of overheating in 122 London dwellings during the summers of 2009 and 2010. Dry Bulb Temperature and Relative Humidity in the main living and sleeping area were monitored at 10 min intervals. The ASHRAE Standard 55 adaptive thermal comfort method was applied, which uses outdoor temperature to derive the optimum indoor comfort temperature. It was found that 29% of all living rooms and 31% of all bedrooms monitored during 2009 had more than 1% of summertime occupied hours outside the comfort zone recommended by the standard to achieve 90% acceptability. In 2010, 37% of monitored living rooms and 49% of monitored bedrooms had more than 1% of summertime occupied hours outside this comfort zone. The findings of this study indicate that London dwellings face a significant risk of overheating under the current climate. Occupant exposure to excess indoor temperatures is likely to be exacerbated in the future if climate change adaptation strategies are not incorporated in Building Regulations, building design and retrofit.

Type: Article
Title: Monitoring summer indoor overheating in the London housing stock
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.02.049
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.02.049
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Overheating, Temperature, Monitoring, Housing, Dwellings, Climate change
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > Bartlett School Env, Energy and Resources
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1550175
Downloads since deposit
147Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item