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Expanding the phenotype in argininosuccinic aciduria: need for new therapies

Baruteau, J; Jameson, E; Morris, AA; Chakrapani, A; Santra, S; Vijay, S; Kocadag, H; ... Davison, JE; + view all (2017) Expanding the phenotype in argininosuccinic aciduria: need for new therapies. Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease , 40 (3) pp. 357-368. 10.1007/s10545-017-0022-x. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This UK-wide study defines the natural history of argininosuccinic aciduria and compares long-term neurological outcomes in patients presenting clinically or treated prospectively from birth with ammonia-lowering drugs. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of medical records prior to March 2013, then prospective analysis until December 2015. Blinded review of brain MRIs. ASL genotyping. RESULTS: Fifty-six patients were defined as early-onset (n = 23) if symptomatic < 28 days of age, late-onset (n = 23) if symptomatic later, or selectively screened perinatally due to a familial proband (n = 10). The median follow-up was 12.4 years (range 0-53). Long-term outcomes in all groups showed a similar neurological phenotype including developmental delay (48/52), epilepsy (24/52), ataxia (9/52), myopathy-like symptoms (6/52) and abnormal neuroimaging (12/21). Neuroimaging findings included parenchymal infarcts (4/21), focal white matter hyperintensity (4/21), cortical or cerebral atrophy (4/21), nodular heterotopia (2/21) and reduced creatine levels in white matter (4/4). 4/21 adult patients went to mainstream school without the need of additional educational support and 1/21 lives independently. Early-onset patients had more severe involvement of visceral organs including liver, kidney and gut. All early-onset and half of late-onset patients presented with hyperammonaemia. Screened patients had normal ammonia at birth and received treatment preventing severe hyperammonaemia. ASL was sequenced (n = 19) and 20 mutations were found. Plasma argininosuccinate was higher in early-onset compared to late-onset patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our study further defines the natural history of argininosuccinic aciduria and genotype-phenotype correlations. The neurological phenotype does not correlate with the severity of hyperammonaemia and plasma argininosuccinic acid levels. The disturbance in nitric oxide synthesis may be a contributor to the neurological disease. Clinical trials providing nitric oxide to the brain merit consideration.

Type: Article
Title: Expanding the phenotype in argininosuccinic aciduria: need for new therapies
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s10545-017-0022-x
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10545-017-0022-x
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1544147
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