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Exercise does not enhance aged bone's impaired response to artificial loading in C57Bl/6 mice.

Meakin, LB; Udeh, C; Galea, GL; Lanyon, LE; Price, JS; (2015) Exercise does not enhance aged bone's impaired response to artificial loading in C57Bl/6 mice. Bone , 81 pp. 47-52. 10.1016/j.bone.2015.06.026. Green open access

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Abstract

Bones adapt their structure to their loading environment and so ensure that they become, and are maintained, sufficiently strong to withstand the loads to which they are habituated. The effectiveness of this process declines with age and bones become fragile fracturing with less force. This effect in humans also occurs in mice which experience age-related bone loss and reduced adaptation to loading. Exercise engenders many systemic and local muscular physiological responses as well as engendering local bone strain. To investigate whether these physiological responses influence bones' adaptive responses to mechanical strain we examined whether a period of treadmill exercise influenced the adaptive response to an associated period of artificial loading in young adult (17-week) and old (19-month) mice. After treadmill acclimatization, mice were exercised for 30 min three times per week for two weeks. Three hours after each exercise period, right tibiae were subjected to 40 cycles of non-invasive axial loading engendering peak strain of 2250 με. In both young and aged mice exercise increased cross-sectional muscle area and serum sclerostin concentration. In young mice it also increased serum IGF1. Exercise did not affect bone's adaptation to loading in any measured parameter in young or aged bone. These data demonstrate that a level of exercise sufficient to cause systemic changes in serum, and adaptive changes in local musculature, has no effect on bone's response to loading 3h later. This study provides no support for the beneficial effects of exercise on bone in the elderly being mediated by systemic or local muscle-derived effects rather than local adaptation to altered mechanical strain.

Type: Article
Title: Exercise does not enhance aged bone's impaired response to artificial loading in C57Bl/6 mice.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bone.2015.06.026
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.bone.2015.06.026
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors or contributors. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). You may copy and distribute the article, create extracts, abstracts and new works from the article, alter and revise the article, text or data mine the article and otherwise reuse the article commercially (including reuse and/or resale of the article) without permission from Elsevier. You must give appropriate credit to the original work, together with a link to the formal publication through the relevant DOI and a link to the Creative Commons user license above. You must indicate if any changes are made but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use of the work. Permission is not required for this type of reuse.
Keywords: Aging, Artificial loading, Bone adaptation, Exercise, Strain, Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Bone and Bones, Female, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Physical Conditioning, Animal, Resistance Training, Stress, Mechanical, Weight-Bearing, X-Ray Microtomography
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1543955
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