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Pre-operative anaemia is associated with total morbidity burden on days 3 and 5 after cardiac surgery: a cohort study

Sanders, J; Cooper, JA; Farrar, D; Braithwaite, S; Sandhu, U; Mythen, MG; Montgomery, HE; (2017) Pre-operative anaemia is associated with total morbidity burden on days 3 and 5 after cardiac surgery: a cohort study. Perioperative Medicine , 6 , Article 1. 10.1186/s13741-017-0057-4. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pre-operative anaemia is associated with mortality and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirement after cardiac surgery. However, the effect on post-operative total morbidity burden (TMB) is unknown. We explored the effect of pre-operative anaemia on post-operative TMB. METHODS: Data were drawn from the Cardiac Post-Operative Morbidity Score (C-POMS) development study (n = 442). C-POMS describes and quantifies (0-13) TMB after cardiac surgery by noting the presence/absence of 13 morbidity domains on days 3 (D3), 5 (D5), 8 (D8) and 15 (D15). Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin concentration below 130 g/l for men and 120 g/l for women. RESULTS: Most patients were White British (86.1%) and male (79.2%) and underwent coronary artery bypass surgery (67.4%). Participants with pre-operative anaemia (n = 137, 31.5%) were over three times more likely to receive RBC transfusion (OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.88-5.06, p < 0.001), had greater D3 and D5 TMB (5 vs 3, p < 0.0001; 3 vs 2, p < 0.0001, respectively) and remained in hospital 2 days longer (8 vs 6 days, p < 0.0001) than non-anaemic patients. Transfused patients remained in hospital 5 days longer than non-transfused patients (p < 0.0001), had higher TMB on all days (all p < 0.001) and suffered greater pulmonary, renal, GI, neurological, endocrine and ambulation morbidities (p 0.026 to <0.001). Pre-operative anaemia and RBC transfusion were independently associated with increased C-POMS score. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-operative anaemia and RBC transfusion are independently associated with increased post-operative TMB. Understanding TMB may assist in post-operative patient management to reduce morbidity. We recommend the use of the C-POMS tool as a standard outcome tool in further studies.

Type: Article
Title: Pre-operative anaemia is associated with total morbidity burden on days 3 and 5 after cardiac surgery: a cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13741-017-0057-4
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13741-017-0057-4
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Anaemia, Cardiac surgery, Post-operative morbidity, Red blood cell transfusion, Total morbidity burden
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1540297
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