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Gating Alleys to Reduce Crime: A Meta-Analysis and Realist Synthesis

Sidebottom, AL; Tilley, N; Johnson, S; Bowers, K; Tompson, L; Thornton, A; Bullock, K; (2018) Gating Alleys to Reduce Crime: A Meta-Analysis and Realist Synthesis. Justice Quarterly , 35 (1) pp. 55-86. 10.1080/07418825.2017.1293135. Green open access

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Abstract

Alley gates are designed to limit access to alleys and the crime opportunities they afford. Informed by the acronym EMMIE we sought to: (1) systematically review the evidence on whether alley gates are Effective at reducing crime, (2) identify the causal Mechanisms through which alley gates are expected to work and the conditions that Moderate effectiveness, and (3) collate information on the Implementation and Economic costs of alley gating. The results of our meta-analysis suggest that alley gating is associated with modest but significant reductions in burglary, with little evidence of spatial displacement. We also identified six mechanisms through which alley gates might plausibly reduce crime, and the conditions in which such mechanisms are most likely to be activated.

Type: Article
Title: Gating Alleys to Reduce Crime: A Meta-Analysis and Realist Synthesis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2017.1293135
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07418825.2017.1293135
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: alley gates, burglary, EMMIE, situational crime prevention, systematic review
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1540036
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