UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Irregular pedestrian crossing behaviour on a busy road in London: where, who, when, and how

Anciaes, PR; Jones, P; (2017) Irregular pedestrian crossing behaviour on a busy road in London: where, who, when, and how. Presented at: Universities' Transport Study Group 49th Annual Conference, Dublin, Ireland. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Anciaes_and Jones 2016 Irregular pedestrian crossing behaviour on a busy road in London.pdf

Download (514kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper analyses patterns in irregular pedestrian crossing behaviour in Seven Sisters Road, a 6-lane busy road in north London. A video survey was used to observe pedestrians crossing a 400m section of the road where there are no designated crossing facilities, from 7AM to 10PM. A series of features was registered for each of the 1356 road crossings observed, including pedestrian characteristics (gender, age, and mobility restriction), situation (group size and time of day), crossing behaviour (origin and destination, path across the road, walking speeds) and characteristics of incoming vehicles (number, type, speed, and gap to pedestrian). Spatial analysis was used to generate density maps of the space used by pedestrians while crossing the road, of the time spent in that space, and of the points where pedestrians stop or change speed. The maps show that a large number of pedestrians adopt strategies such as waiting and walking along the road's central reservation. Many pedestrians stop on the carriageway or increase speed in parts of road near bus stops and where vehicles are allowed to U-turn. Several statistical models were then estimated. The locations of starting and ending points of irregular crossings are significantly related with distance to bus stops, shortest routes from residential areas to the main road, and elements of the street environment such as crossfalls and parked cars. The frequencies of crossing paths with shallow angles, path changes, and speed changes are higher for younger pedestrians crossing alone, during peak-time or after dark, and near bus stops. The location of the points where pedestrians stop in the carriageway is also related to the number and speed of incoming vehicles, but the relationship is not linear.

Type: Conference item (Presentation)
Title: Irregular pedestrian crossing behaviour on a busy road in London: where, who, when, and how
Event: Universities' Transport Study Group 49th Annual Conference
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Dates: 04 January 2017 - 06 January 2017
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1538001
Downloads since deposit
67Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item