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Use of high-frequency ultrasound to study the prenatal development of cranial neural tube defects and hydrocephalus in Gldc-deficient mice

Autuori, MC; Pai, YJ; Stuckey, DJ; Savery, D; Marconi, AM; Massa, V; Lythgoe, MF; ... Greene, NDE; + view all (2017) Use of high-frequency ultrasound to study the prenatal development of cranial neural tube defects and hydrocephalus in Gldc-deficient mice. Prenatal Diagnosis , 37 (3) pp. 273-281. 10.1002/pd.5004. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We used non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging to investigate embryonic brain development in a mouse model for neural tube defects (NTDs) and non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). METHOD: Using HFUS, we imaged embryos carrying loss of function alleles of Gldc encoding glycine decarboxylase, a component of the glycine cleavage system in mitochondrial folate metabolism, which is known to be associated with cranial NTDs and NKH in humans. We serially examined the same litter during the second half of embryonic development and quantified cerebral structures. Genotype was confirmed using PCR. Histology was used to confirm ultrasound findings. RESULTS: High-frequency ultrasound allowed in utero detection of two major brain abnormalities in Gldc-deficient mouse embryos, cranial NTDs (exencephaly) and ventriculomegaly (corresponding with the previous finding of post-natal hydrocephalus). Serial ultrasound allowed individual embryos to be analysed at successive gestational time points. From embryonic day 16.5 to 18.5, the lateral ventricle volume reduced in wild-type and heterozygous embryos but increased in homozygous Gldc-deficient embryos. CONCLUSION: Exencephaly and ventriculomegaly were detectable by HFUS in homozygous Gldc-deficient mouse embryos indicating this to be an effective tool to study CNS development. Longitudinal analysis of the same embryo allowed the prenatal onset and progression of ventricle enlargement in Gldc-deficient mice to be determined. © 2017 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Type: Article
Title: Use of high-frequency ultrasound to study the prenatal development of cranial neural tube defects and hydrocephalus in Gldc-deficient mice
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/pd.5004
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1002/pd.5004
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1535965
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