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Coercion or Conformism? Censorship and Self-Censorship among Russian Media Personalities and Reporters in the 2010s

Schimpfossl, E; Yablokov, I; (2014) Coercion or Conformism? Censorship and Self-Censorship among Russian Media Personalities and Reporters in the 2010s. Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization , 22 (2) pp. 295-311. Green open access

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Abstract

This article examines questions of censorship, self-censorship and conformism on Russia’s federal television networks during Putin’s third presidential term. It challenges the idea that the political views and images broadcast by federal television are imposed coercively upon reporters, presenters and anchors. Based on an analysis of interviews with famous media personalities as well as rank-and-file reporters, this article argues that media governance in contemporary Russia does not need to resort to coercive methods, or the exertion of self-censorship among its staff, to support government views. Quite the contrary: reporters enjoy relatively large leeway to develop their creativity, which is crucial for state-aligned television networks to keep audience ratings up. Those pundits, anchors and reporters who are involved in the direct promotion of Kremlin positions usually have consciously and deliberately chosen to do so. The more famous they are, the more they partake in the production of political discourses.

Type: Article
Title: Coercion or Conformism? Censorship and Self-Censorship among Russian Media Personalities and Reporters in the 2010s
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://www2.gwu.edu/~ieresgwu/programs/demokratiz...
Language: English
Additional information: Made available with the permission of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, George Washington University. Please see the journal website for information on copyright.
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1534148
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