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Developing a Set of Core Outcomes for Trials in Haemodialysis: An International Delphi Survey

Evangelidis, N; Tong, A; Manns, B; Hemmelgarn, B; Wheeler, D; Tugwell, P; Crowe, S; ... Craig, J; + view all (2016) Developing a Set of Core Outcomes for Trials in Haemodialysis: An International Delphi Survey. In: (Proceedings) The 15th Asian Pacific Congress of Nephrology (APCN) and 52nd ANZSN ASM, 17–21 September 2016, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Western Australia. (pp. p. 119). Wiley-Blackwell Green open access

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Abstract

AIM: To generate a consensus-based, prioritized list of core outcomes for trials in haemodialysis. BACKGROUND: Survival and quality of life for patients on haemodialysis remain poor despite substantial research efforts. Existing trials often report surrogate outcomes that may not be relevant to patients and clinicians. A core outcome set that reflects stakeholder priorities would improve the relevance, efficiency, and comparability of haemodialysis trials. METHODS: In an online Delphi survey, participants rated the importance of outcomes using a 9-point Likert scale. In Round 2 and 3, participants reviewed the scores and comments of other respondents and re-rated the outcomes. For each outcome, we calculated the median, mean, and proportion rating 7-9 (“critically important”). RESULTS: 1,181 participants (202 [17%] patients/caregivers, 979 health professionals) from 73 countries completed Round 1 and 838 (150 [18%] patients/caregivers) completed Round 3 (71% response rate). Outcomes achieving consensus as high priorities across both groups were: vascular access complications, cardiovascular disease, mortality, dialysis adequacy and fatigue. Patients/caregivers rated four outcomes higher than health professionals: ability to travel (mean difference 0.9), dialysis-free time (0.5), dialysis adequacy (0.3), and washed out after dialysis (0.2). Health professionals rated 11 outcomes higher: mortality (1.0), hospitalization (1.0), drop in blood pressure (1.0), vascular access complications (0.9), depression (0.9), cardiovascular disease (0.8), target weight (0.7), infection (0.4), potassium (0.4), ability to work (0.3), and pain (0.3). CONCLUSIONS: The top stakeholder prioritized outcomes were vascular access problems, cardiovascular disease, mortality, dialysis adequacy and fatigue. Patients/caregivers gave higher priority to lifestyle-related outcomes than health professionals. This prioritized set of outcomes can inform the establishment of a core outcome set, to improve the value of trial evidence to support decision-making for people on haemodialysis.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Developing a Set of Core Outcomes for Trials in Haemodialysis: An International Delphi Survey
Event: The 15th Asian Pacific Congress of Nephrology (APCN) and 52nd ANZSN ASM, 17–21 September 2016, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Western Australia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/nep.12887
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nep.12887
Language: English
Additional information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: (2016), Mini Oral Abstracts. Nephrology, 21: 58–149., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1111/nep.12887. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Urology & Nephrology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1531979
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