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Extremism, religion and psychiatric morbidity in a population-based sample of young men

Coid, JW; Bhui, K; MacManus, D; Kallis, C; Bebbington, P; Ullrich, S; (2016) Extremism, religion and psychiatric morbidity in a population-based sample of young men. British Journal of Psychiatry , 209 (6) pp. 491-497. 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.186510. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is growing risk from terrorism following radicalisation of young men. It is unclear whether psychopathology is associated. AIMS: To investigate the population distribution of extremist views among UK men. METHOD: Cross-sectional study of 3679 men, 18-34 years, in Great Britain. Multivariate analyses of attitudes, psychiatric morbidity, ethnicity and religion. RESULTS: Pro-British men were more likely to be White, UK born, not religious; anti-British were Muslim, religious, of Pakistani origin, from deprived areas. Pro- and anti-British views were linearly associated with violence (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% CI 1.38-1.64, P<0.001, adjusted OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.13-1.58, P<0.001, respectively) and negatively with depression (adjusted OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.61-0.85, P<0.001, adjusted OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.86, P = 0.003, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Men at risk of depression may experience protection from strong cultural or religious identity. Antisocial behaviour increases with extremism. Religion is protective but may determine targets of violence following radicalisation.

Type: Article
Title: Extremism, religion and psychiatric morbidity in a population-based sample of young men
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.186510
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.116.186510
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > IoN RLW Inst of Neurological Sci
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1530830
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