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Seismic Loss and Downtime Assessment of Existing Tall Steel-Framed Buildings and Strategies for Increased Resilience

Molina Hutt, C; Almufti, I; Willford, M; Deierlein, G; (2015) Seismic Loss and Downtime Assessment of Existing Tall Steel-Framed Buildings and Strategies for Increased Resilience. Journal of Structural Engineering , 142 (8) C4015005-C4015005. 10.1061/(ASCE)ST.1943-541X.0001314. Green open access

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Abstract

In areas of high seismicity in the United States, the design of many existing tall buildings followed guidelines that do not provide an explicit understanding of performance during major earthquakes. This paper presents an assessment of the seismic performance of existing tall buildings and strategies for increased resilience for a case study city, San Francisco, where an archetype tall building is designed based on an inventory of the existing tall building stock. A 40-story moment-resisting frame system is selected as a representative tall building. The archetype building is rectangular in plan and represents the state of design and construction practice from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s. Nonlinear response history analysis (NLRHA) are conducted with ground motions representative of the design earthquake hazard level defined in current building codes, with explicit consideration of near-fault directivity effects. Mean transient interstory drifts and story accelerations under the 10% in 50-year ground motion hazard range from 0.19 to 1.14% and 0.15 to 0.81 g, respectively. In order to influence decision making, performance is reported as the expected consequences in terms of direct economic losses and downtime. Furthermore, to achieve increased levels of resilience, a number of strategies are proposed including seismic improvements to structural and nonstructural systems as well as mitigation measures to minimize impeding factors. Expected direct economic losses for the archetype building are in the order of 34% of building cost and downtime estimates for functional recovery are 87 weeks. The strategies presented in this paper enable up to a 92% reduction in losses and minimize downtime for functional recovery to 1 day or less.

Type: Article
Title: Seismic Loss and Downtime Assessment of Existing Tall Steel-Framed Buildings and Strategies for Increased Resilience
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)ST.1943-541X.0001314
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)ST.1943-541X.0001314
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017 American Society of Civil Engineers. All rights reserved.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1518028
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