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Viral gastrointestinal infections and norovirus genotypes in a paediatric UK hospital, 2014-2015

Brown, JR; Shah, D; Breuer, J; (2016) Viral gastrointestinal infections and norovirus genotypes in a paediatric UK hospital, 2014-2015. Journal of Clinical Virology , 84 pp. 1-6. 10.1016/j.jcv.2016.08.298. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Diarrhoea in children is a common disease; understanding the incidence of causative viruses can aid infection control and vaccine development. OBJECTIVES: Describe the incidence and characteristics of gastroenteric viruses including norovirus genotypes in a paediatric hospital cohort. STUDY DESIGN: Norovirus, adenovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus qPCR and norovirus genotyping results for all stool specimens (n = 4786; 1393 patients) at a UK paediatric tertiary referral hospital June 2014–July 2015. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 24% (329/1393) of patients were positive for a GI virus; the majority were positive for norovirus (44%, 144/329) or adenovirus (44%, 146/329). The overall incidence of rotavirus (2%) is reduced compared to pre-vaccination studies; however the incidence of other GI viruses has not increased. Norovirus infections had a significantly higher virus burden compared to other GI viruses (P ≤0.03); sapovirus infections had the lowest viral burden. The number of norovirus cases per month did not follow the typical winter seasonal trend of nationally reported outbreaks. The number of cases per month correlates with the number of hospital admissions (R = 0.703, P = 0.011); the number of admissions accounts for 50% of the variability in number of cases per month. The breadth of genotypes seen (48% non-GII.4), suggests a community source for many norovirus infections and has implications for vaccine development. All GI viruses caused chronic infections, with the majority (50–100%) in immunocompromised patients. Incidence or duration of infection in chronic norovirus infections did not differ between genotypes, suggesting host-mediated susceptibility.

Type: Article
Title: Viral gastrointestinal infections and norovirus genotypes in a paediatric UK hospital, 2014-2015
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcv.2016.08.298
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2016.08.298
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: Viral gastroenteritis; Paediatric; Polymerase chain reaction; PCR; Norovirus; Genotypes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1517669
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