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Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Laryngeal Replacement

Ansari, T; Lange, P; Southgate, A; Greco, K; Carvalho, C; Partington, L; Bullock, A; ... Birchall, MA; + view all (2017) Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Laryngeal Replacement. Stem Cells Translational Medicine , 6 (2) pp. 677-687. 10.5966/sctm.2016-0130. Green open access

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Abstract

Patients with laryngeal disorders may have severe morbidity relating to swallowing, vocalization, and respiratory function, for which conventional therapies are suboptimal. A tissue-engineered approach would aim to restore the vocal folds and maintain respiratory function while limiting the extent of scarring in the regenerated tissue. Under Good Laboratory Practice conditions, we decellularized porcine larynges, using detergents and enzymes under negative pressure to produce an acellular scaffold comprising cartilage, muscle, and mucosa. To assess safety and functionality before clinical trials, a decellularized hemilarynx seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and a tissue-engineered oral mucosal sheet was implanted orthotopically into six pigs. The seeded grafts were left in situ for 6 months and assessed using computed tomography imaging, bronchoscopy, and mucosal brushings, together with vocal recording and histological analysis on explantation. The graft caused no adverse respiratory function, nor did it impact swallowing or vocalization. Rudimentary vocal folds covered by contiguous epithelium were easily identifiable. In conclusion, the proposed tissue-engineered approach represents a viable alternative treatment for laryngeal defects. SIGNIFICANCE: This report describes the production and in vivo implantation of a biologically derived hemilarynx and subsequent in vivo assessment and analysis under regulated Good Laboratory Practice conditions. This study illustrates how physiological laryngeal-related functions can be retained.

Type: Article
Title: Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Laryngeal Replacement
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.5966/sctm.2016-0130
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.5966/sctm.2016-0130
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Animal model, Human stem cell, Larynx, Tissue engineering, Tissue scaffold
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > VP: Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > VP: Health > Translational Research Office
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1516961
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