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Interfacial water studies and their relevance for the energy sector

Striolo, A; (2016) Interfacial water studies and their relevance for the energy sector. Molecular Physics , 114 (18) pp. 2615-2626. 10.1080/00268976.2016.1237685. Green open access

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Abstract

Interfacial water is ubiquitous, and its investigation has attracted the interest of many for both fundamental and applied purposes. This perspective provides a few highlights concerning how molecular and sometimes multi-scale investigations on the properties of interfacial water could be of practical relevance for the energy sector. The discussion focuses on the transport of electrolytes through narrow pores, and on the solubility and transport properties of confined hydrocarbons, with particular attention in attempting to describe how interfacial water can affect such properties, especially within narrow pores. Recent results on the self-assembly of surfactants on heterogeneous surfaces are also briefly discussed. Finally, a few possible directions for future research are suggested. It should be stressed that this is not a comprehensive review on the possible impact of interfacial water studies on the energy sector, but rather a brief commentary on some personal interests, with the intent of stimulating debate.

Type: Article
Title: Interfacial water studies and their relevance for the energy sector
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/00268976.2016.1237685
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1080/00268976.2016.1237685
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Molecular Physics on 12 October 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00268976.2016.1237685
Keywords: Electrolytes, enhanced oil recovery, transport, carbon sequestration, hydrocarbon solubility
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1516048
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