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Salivary testosterone levels and health status in men and women in the British general population: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).

Clifton, S; Macdowall, W; Copas, AJ; Tanton, C; Keevil, BG; Lee, DM; Mitchell, KR; ... Wu, F; + view all (2016) Salivary testosterone levels and health status in men and women in the British general population: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism , 101 (11) pp. 3939-3951. 10.1210/jc.2016-1669. Green open access

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Abstract

CONTEXT: Salivary testosterone (Sal-T) measurement by LC-MS/MS resents the opportunity to examine health correlates of Sal-T in a large-scale population survey. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between Sal-T and health-related factors in men and women aged 18-74 years. DESIGN & SETTING: Morning saliva samples were obtained from participants in a cross-sectional probability-sample survey of the general British population ('Natsal-3'). Self-reported health and lifestyle questions were administered as part of a wider sexual health interview. PARTICIPANTS: 1,599 men; 2,123 women. METHODS: Sal-T was measured using LC-MS/MS; linear regression was used to examine associations between health factors and mean Sal-T. RESULTS: In men, mean Sal-T was associated with a range of health factors after age-adjustment, showing a strong independent negative association with BMI. Men reporting cardiovascular disease or currently taking medication for depression had lower age-adjusted Sal-T, although there was no association with cardiovascular disease after adjustment for BMI. The decline in Sal-T with increasing age remained after adjustment for health-related factors. In women, Sal-T declined with increasing age, however there were no age-independent associations with health-related factors or specific heath conditions, with the exception of higher Sal-T in smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Sal-T levels were associated, independently of age, with a range of self-reported health markers, particularly BMI, in men but not women. The findings support the view that there is an age-related decline in Sal-T in men and women, which cannot be explained by an increase in ill-health. Our results demonstrate the potential of Sal-T as a convenient measure of tissue androgen exposure for population research.

Type: Article
Title: Salivary testosterone levels and health status in men and women in the British general population: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1210/jc.2016-1669
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2016-1669
Language: English
Additional information: This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Copyright for this article is retained by the author(s).
Keywords: Testosterone, Health Status, Humans
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1508784
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