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Using Super-Imposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR) to relate pubertal growth to bone health in later life: the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development

Cole, TJ; Kuh, D; Johnson, W; Ward, KA; Howe, LD; Adams, JE; Hardy, R; (2016) Using Super-Imposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR) to relate pubertal growth to bone health in later life: the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development. International Journal of Epidemiology , 45 (4) pp. 1125-1134. 10.1093/ije/dyw134. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: To explore associations between pubertal growth and later bone health in a cohort with infrequent measurements, using another cohort with more frequent measurements to support the modelling, data from the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (2-26 years, 4901/30 004 subjects/measurements) and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents And Children (ALSPAC) (5-20 years) (10 896/74 120) were related to National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) bone health outcomes at 60-64 years. METHODS: NSHD data were analysed using Super-Imposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR) growth curve analysis, either alone or jointly with ALSPAC data. Improved estimation of pubertal growth parameters of size, tempo and velocity was assessed by changes in model fit and correlations with contemporary measures of pubertal timing. Bone outcomes of radius [trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and diaphysis cross-sectional area (CSA)] were regressed on the SITAR parameters, adjusted for current body size. RESULTS: The NSHD SITAR parameters were better estimated in conjunction with ALSPAC, i.e. more strongly correlated with pubertal timing. Trabecular vBMD was associated with early height tempo, whereas diaphysis CSA was related to weight size, early tempo and slow velocity, the bone outcomes being around 15% higher for the better vs worse growth pattern. CONCLUSIONS: By pooling NSHD and ALSPAC data, SITAR more accurately summarized pubertal growth and weight gain in NSHD, and in turn demonstrated notable associations between pubertal timing and later bone outcomes. These associations give insight into the importance of the pubertal period for future skeletal health and osteoporosis risk.

Type: Article
Title: Using Super-Imposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR) to relate pubertal growth to bone health in later life: the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyw134
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyw134
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: SITAR, ageing, bone, density, height, puberty, weight
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1508143
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