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The dysconnection hypothesis (2016)

Friston, K; Brown, HR; Siemerkus, J; Stephan, KE; (2016) The dysconnection hypothesis (2016). Schizophrenia research , 176 (2-3) pp. 83-94. 10.1016/j.schres.2016.07.014. Green open access

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Abstract

Twenty years have passed since the dysconnection hypothesis was first proposed (Friston and Frith, 1995; Weinberger, 1993). In that time, neuroscience has witnessed tremendous advances: we now live in a world of non-invasive neuroanatomy, computational neuroimaging and the Bayesian brain. The genomics era has come and gone. Connectomics and large-scale neuroinformatics initiatives are emerging everywhere. So where is the dysconnection hypothesis now? This article considers how the notion of schizophrenia as a dysconnection syndrome has developed – and how it has been enriched by recent advances in clinical neuroscience. In particular, we examine the dysconnection hypothesis in the context of (i) theoretical neurobiology and computational psychiatry; (ii) the empirical insights afforded by neuroimaging and associated connectomics – and (iii) how bottom-up (molecular biology and genetics) and top-down (systems biology) perspectives are converging on the mechanisms and nature of dysconnections in schizophrenia.

Type: Article
Title: The dysconnection hypothesis (2016)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2016.07.014
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2016.07.014
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Psychiatry, Schizophrenia, Dysconnection, Neuromodulation, Bayesian, Predictive coding, Neurogenetics, NMDA RECEPTOR HYPOFUNCTION, 22Q11.2 DELETION SYNDROME, GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION, DE-NOVO MUTATIONS, MISMATCH NEGATIVITY, FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, MOUSE MODEL, FREE-ENERGY, CONNECTIONIST APPROACH
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1506355
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