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Visual Acuity Loss and Associated Risk Factors in the Retrospective Progression of Stargardt Disease Study (ProgStar Report No. 2)

Kong, X; Strauss, RW; Michaelides, M; Cideciyan, AV; Sahel, J-A; Munoz, B; West, S; ... Grp, PS; + view all (2016) Visual Acuity Loss and Associated Risk Factors in the Retrospective Progression of Stargardt Disease Study (ProgStar Report No. 2). Ophthalmology , 123 (9) pp. 1887-1897. 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.05.027. Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the association between characteristics of Stargardt disease and visual acuity (VA), to estimate the longitudinal rate of VA loss, and to identify risk factors for VA loss. DESIGN: Retrospective, multicenter cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 176 patients (332 eyes) with molecularly and clinically confirmed Stargardt disease enrolled from the United States and Europe. METHODS: Standardized data report forms were used to collect retrospective data on participants' characteristics and best-corrected or presenting VA from medical charts. Linear models with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the cross-sectional associations, and linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the longitudinal VA loss. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Yearly change in VA. RESULTS: The median duration of observation was 3.6 years. At baseline, older age of symptom onset was associated with better VA, and a longer duration of symptoms was associated with worse VA. Longitudinal analysis estimated an average of 0.3 lines loss (P < 0.0001) per year overall, but the rate varied according to baseline VA: (1) eyes with baseline VA ≥20/25 (N = 53) declined at a rate of approximately 1.0 line per year; (2) eyes with VA between 20/25 and 20/70 (N = 65) declined at a rate of approximately 0.9 lines per year; (3) eyes with VA between 20/70 and 20/200 (N = 163) declined at a rate of 0.2 lines per year; and (4) eyes with VA worse than 20/200 (n = 49) improved at a rate of 0.5 lines per year. Older age of onset was associated with slower VA loss: Patients with onset age >30 years showed 0.4 lines slower change of VA per year (P = 0.01) compared with patients with onset age ≤14 years. CONCLUSIONS: Given the overall slow rate of VA loss, VA is unlikely to be a sensitive outcome measure for treatment trials of Stargardt disease. However, given the faster decline in younger patients and those with no or mild visual impairment, VA may be a potential outcome measure for trials targeting such subgroups of patients. These observations will need to be assessed in a prospective study bearing in mind the inherent limitations of retrospective datasets.

Type: Article
Title: Visual Acuity Loss and Associated Risk Factors in the Retrospective Progression of Stargardt Disease Study (ProgStar Report No. 2)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.05.027
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.05.027
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016. This manuscript version is published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This licence allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0. Access may be initially restricted by the publisher.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Ophthalmology, Macular Dystrophies, Geographic Atrophy, Outcome Measure, Improvement, Phenotype, Trials
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1506128
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