UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Evaluation of preferences of women and healthcare professionals in Singapore for implementation of noninvasive prenatal testing for Down syndrome

Barrett, AN; Advani, HV; Chitty, LS; Su, LL; Biswas, A; Tan, WC; Hill, M; (2016) Evaluation of preferences of women and healthcare professionals in Singapore for implementation of noninvasive prenatal testing for Down syndrome. Singapore Medical Journal , 58 (6) pp. 298-310. 10.11622/smedj.2016114. Green open access

[thumbnail of Hill_SMJ-58-298.pdf]
Preview
Text
Hill_SMJ-58-298.pdf - Published Version

Download (252kB) | Preview

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Invasive prenatal diagnosis (IPD) has long been used to prenatally diagnose Down syndrome (DS), but is associated with a small risk of miscarriage. Meanwhile, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is a highly sensitive screening test using cell-free DNA in maternal blood for detection of DS that removes the risk of miscarriage, but confers a small risk of false-positive and false-negative results. Their implementations into clinical practice require an understanding of stakeholder preferences. METHODS: A total of 69 health professionals (HPs) and 301 women took part in a discrete choice experiment (DCE) in which preferences for four prenatal test attributes (accuracy, time of results, risk of miscarriage and amount of information provided) were assessed, and conditional logit regression was used to analyse data. Data on demographics and ranked preferences for test attributes were collected, and a direct choice between NIPT, IPD or neither test was given. RESULTS: Women showed a preference for test safety, whereas HPs prioritised test accuracy above all other attributes. When offered a direct choice between NIPT, IPD or neither test, women aged over 35 years, those with previous miscarriage or who knew a child with DS were more likely to choose NIPT than IPD. Chinese women preferred NIPT whereas Indian women preferred IPD. CONCLUSION: Our data highlight the need for patient-specific counselling, taking into account previous experiences and cultural factors. Since women and HPs prioritise different test attributes, it is essential that HPs recognise these differences in order to provide non-biased counselling.

Type: Article
Title: Evaluation of preferences of women and healthcare professionals in Singapore for implementation of noninvasive prenatal testing for Down syndrome
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.11622/smedj.2016114
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.11622/smedj.2016114
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Singapore Medical Association.
Keywords: NIPT, cell-free DNA, cell-free fetal DNA, prenatal screening
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1504652
Downloads since deposit
87Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item