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The Mechanical Underpinning of Tumour-induced Angiogenesis and Growth

Vavourakis, V; Wijeratne, P; Shipley, R; Stylianopoulos, T; Hawkes, DJ; (2016) The Mechanical Underpinning of Tumour-induced Angiogenesis and Growth. In: Proceedings of the 24th UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering. Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering (ACME): Cardiff, UK. Green open access

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Abstract

Angiongenic vessel growth is widely acknowledged to be a fundamental process that underpins cancer growth, invasion and metastasis, and it is highly instructive to construct and test reliable mechano-biological models of this process. Whereas previous studies have explored the chemical underpinning of both tumour growth and angiogenesis, here we extend these frameworks significantly to focus on the interplay between angiogenic network evolution and growth-induced solid stresses through a hapto- and mechanotactic stimulus for vessel sprouting, and a mechanics based remodelling process of the microvasculature. The proposed three-dimensional, multiscale in silico model for tumour-induced angiogenesis and growth is validated against in vivo data from murine mammary carcinomas, specifically focusing on the role of mechanical signals in recapitulating experimental evidence.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: The Mechanical Underpinning of Tumour-induced Angiogenesis and Growth
Event: 24th UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering
Location: Cardiff, UK
Dates: 30 June 2016 - 01 June 2016
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://acme2016.sciencesconf.org/87678
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: cancer mechanics; neo-vascularisation; tumour microenvironment; multiscale model; finite element method
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1500898
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