UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Impact of Storage at -80°C on Encapsulated Liver Spheroids After Liquid Nitrogen Storage

Kilbride, P; Gonzalez-Molina, J; Maurmann, N; Mendonça da Silva, J; Gibbons, S; Selden, C; Fuller, B; (2016) Impact of Storage at -80°C on Encapsulated Liver Spheroids After Liquid Nitrogen Storage. Bioresearch Open Access , 5 (1) pp. 146-154. 10.1089/biores.2016.0017. Green open access

[thumbnail of Impact of Storage at -80°C on Encapsulated Liver Spheroids After Liquid Nitrogen Storage.pdf]
Preview
Text
Impact of Storage at -80°C on Encapsulated Liver Spheroids After Liquid Nitrogen Storage.pdf - Published version

Download (813kB) | Preview

Abstract

For many bioengineered tissues to have practical clinical application, cryopreservation for use on demand is essential. This study examined different thermal histories on warming and short holding periods at different subzero temperatures on subsequent functional recoveries of alginate encapsulated liver spheroids (ELS) for use in a bioartificial liver device. This mimicked transport at liquid nitrogen (-196°C) or dry ice (∼-80°C) temperatures. Holding at -80°C on warming after -196°C storage resulted in ELS expressing significant (p < 0.001) damage compared with direct thaw from liquid nitrogen, with viable cell number falling from 74.0 ± 8.4 million viable cells/mL without -80°C storage to 1.9 ± 0.6 million viable cells/mL 72 h post-thaw after 8 days storage at -80°C. Even 1 day at -80°C after -196°C storage resulted in lower viability (down 21% 24 h post-thaw), viable cell count (down 29% 24 h post-thaw), glucose, and alpha-1-fetoprotein production (reduced by 59% and 95% 24 h from 1 day post-thaw, respectively). Storage at -80°C was determined to be harmful only during the warming cycle. Chemical measurements of the alginate component of ELS were unchanged by cryogenic exposure in either condition.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of Storage at -80°C on Encapsulated Liver Spheroids After Liquid Nitrogen Storage
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1089/biores.2016.0017
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/biores.2016.0017
Language: English
Additional information: © Peter Kilbride etal. 2016; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.
Keywords: HEPG2 cells, alginate encapsulation, bioartificial liver device, cryopreservation, warming rates
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1499784
Downloads since deposit
30Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item